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Events & Exhibits

Events & Exhibits

Click to see our current and upcoming events and exhibits.  Stay up to date on programs and see a calender view of upcoming events.

Save the Stupey Cabin Campaign

Save the Stupey Cabin Campaign

Building on the highly successful Stupey Cabin picnic held in June, The Highland Park Historical Society is launching a yearlong effort to raise $120,000 to preserve the pioneer structure 19th century building.

Vocational Arts and Better Homes in America

Vocational Arts and Better Homes in America

From the Highland Park Classroom to America’s Living Room

Upcoming Events

Oct
25

Leopold and Loeb Files: An Intimate Look at One of America’s Infamous Crimes

          In 1924, University of Chicago students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were young, rich, and looking for a thrill. The crime that came next--the brutal, cold-blood murder of 14-year-old Bobby Franks--would come to captivate the country and unfold into what many dubbed the crime of the century. As the decades passed, the mythology surrounding the unlikely killers continued to capture the interest of new generations, spawning numerous books, fictionalizations, and dramatizations.          In The Leopold and Loeb Files, author Nina Barrett returns to the primary sources--confessions, interrogation transcripts, psychological reports, and more--the kind of rare, pre-computer court documents that were usually destroyed as a matter of course. Until now, these documents have not been part of the murder's central narrative. This first-of-its-kind approach allows readers to view the case through a keyhole and look past all of the stories that have been spun in the last 90 years to focus on the heart of the crime.
Sep
20

High and Dry on the North Shore

The Highland Park Historical Society and Highwood Historical Society jointly present ‘High and Dry on the North Shore,” by Bill Savage. When the 18th Amendment was enacted in 1919, the fifth-largest industry in the United States became illegal.  While many parts of the country (including, famously, many north-of-Chicago suburbs) were already legally “Dry,” Prohibition changed the political and moral landscape of the nation, introducing intrusive federal law enforcement, a new kind of organized crime, and the “scofflaw.”  In this talk, Bill Savage will discuss how the politics of Temperance, and the battle between Wets and Drys, exposes rifts in American identity (and American food-and-drink culture) that still resonate today.  Using George Ade’s The Old-Time Saloon as a guide, he will explore Prohibition historian Daniel Okrent’s not-so-rhetorical question: “How the Hell Did that Happen?”

News

Food Biography of Chicago

Podcast The Highland Park Historical Society presents ‘Food Biography of Chicago’...