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Save the Stupey Cabin




Events & Exhibits

Events & Exhibits

Click to see our current and upcoming events and exhibits.  Stay up to date on programs and see a calender view of upcoming events.

Save the Stupey Cabin Campaign

Save the Stupey Cabin Campaign

Building on the highly successful Stupey Cabin picnic held in June, The Highland Park Historical Society is launching a yearlong effort to raise $120,000 to preserve the pioneer structure 19th century building.

Vocational Arts and Better Homes in America

Vocational Arts and Better Homes in America

From the Highland Park Classroom to America’s Living Room

Upcoming Events

Jun
1

Highland Park 150 History Prize – Youth Deadline

An initiative to contribute to high quality education in Highland Park and environs while stimulating interest in the City's history and use of archives and historical collections at the Library and beyond. With local history and collections as an educational tool, the Highland Park History Prize aims to encourage original research. Although this effort is intended to reach all and cover a broad spectrum of local history topics, the prize will encourage new study of historical events, actors and groups in Highland Park previously under documented or studied. Examples may include farming and immigrant populations in the 19th centuries; or 21st century newcomers. This prize takes its inspiration from the Chicago History Fair and National History Day. Prizes will be given at 3 age levels: primary-middle, high school and adult. The participants current grade will determine level.Judging will be blind.
May
20

The Archaeology of Two Nineteenth Century Cabins in Kenosha County

Archaeological field research at two nineteenth century Euro-American cabins near UW-Parkside in the Kenosha area in southeastern Wisconsin illustrates what we can learn about day-to-day life in our region at different times in the past. Trapper Jacob Montgomery and his family built a cabin in a lush and supportive forest setting near the Pike River in 1834, and lived there until 1839. Around 1855, another cabin was built some 150 feet away, and was occupied by carpenter Edward Coonley and his family until approximately 1870. Each of these short site occupations give us snapshots of many aspects of Nineteenth Century life in our region, including the early era of pioneer settlement. The remains of the houses and the materials left behind by these families comprise “the tangible debris of everyday life.” What we’ve learned about these two cabins adds significantly to the very limited historical information recorded for the people living at this locality.

News

Food Biography of Chicago

Podcast The Highland Park Historical Society presents ‘Food Biography of Chicago’...